Sand Castles and New Horizons

As we mark the passage of the old year and look forward to new horizons, it might be worthwhile to take a look back at our past and consider how quickly a moment passes.

Sand Castles - New Horizons
Sand Castles

Frank’s portrayal of his grandchildren a decade ago, playing in the sand, is incorporated into this 18″ x 30″ acrylic on wood painting “Sand Castles.” Also featured is the Old Charleston (Morris Island) lighthouse, built in 1876. It is the third tower to occupy that space, the first built in 1767.
His grandson is now in the U.S. Air Force and will complete basic training next month. His granddaughter will be graduating high school in two years. The poignancy of this fleeting moment of childhood is echoed in the old tower, with its outdated technology and the encroaching sea. And yet it still stands, proud, battered, the stories of lives redeemed written in every brick.
We can choose to look back with sorrow and regret or move on with indifference and thoughtlessness. Or we can bless the moment and then let it go. It is our choice. We follow our lights as we can.

“…and the great shroud of the sea rolled on as it rolled five thousand years ago.”
The last line of Moby Dick by Herman Melville

We wish you peace and joy in 2014. Thank you for visiting this site.
Please come again.

Flying Santa – Right Action

Capt. William H. Wincapaw, known as an adventurous and skilled Airman, unknowingly began a tradition in 1929. He was just a guy that wanted to bring holiday cheer to the lighthouse keepers along the East Coast by dropping packages of toys, coffee, shaving supplies, and snacks around Christmas time. He soon became known by the light keepers as the Flying Santa. Over the decades the planes and pilots changed, but except for a break during World War II, the practice continues today, now by helicopter.

This Christmas, Frank wanted to pay special tribute to the new Airman in the family, his grandson Griffyn. So, a new 30” x 24” acrylic on wood panel painting shown below is added today to Frank’s lighthouse series. The lighthouse seen in this painting is the Boston Light.

Flying Santa
Flying Santa

This painting honors those who take special care of the all-important light keepers, as well as the remote Coast Guard outposts.

Now as Griffyn has his first Christmas away from home in the Air Force, we wish him and his group a safe and enjoyable Christmas, as we thank all those who bless and protect us from above.

The Art of Zen Warriors

The Art of Zen Warriors

The Art of Zen Warriors
The Art of Zen Warriors

In Japan the samurai practiced Zen to master the sword. As long as the samurai was afraid of losing his life, he could not act with his full ability. When he was free from the idea of killing or being killed, he could just react to his enemy’s activity, and win. If he tried to win, he might lose. So practicing how to act without fear, which limits your activity, is the most important thing. Although it was a matter of surviving on the battlefield, the samurai fought his fight during his meditation practice.

Shunryu Suzuki

Welcome

Let us open our leaves like a flower, and be passive and receptive.

John Keats

Welcome
Welcome

The acrylic on wood drawing / painting above titled “Welcome” hangs in the entrance to the Art and Zen Sanctuary, to greet all who enter. The overall creation area is 29” x 50” which includes the hand-crafted 3-D frame that Frank built to emulate an Asian character symbolizing an open receptiveness.

Hope…Standing for Nature

Hope…Standing for Nature in the Art and Zen Sanctuary 


A squirrel… stands then and there for nature.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

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“Thank You” to Silent Partner for the music used in this video.

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